Kwajalein Scuba Club does not sell these videos but we do recommend them. They were all created by club members.
This 42 minute video features 13 of the shipwrecks that litter Kwajalein's lagoon floor. Twelve of the wrecks are Japanese, mostly merchant vessels. Japan occupied the Marshall Islands prior to WWII, and Kwajalein was invaded and captured by US forces in 1944. Many ships were sunk in the process. The thirteenth ship, and by far the largest vessel sunk at Kwaj, is the German Heavy Cruiser Prinz Eugen, an escort to the German Battleship Bismarck on her famous breakout into the Atlantic that ended in the sinking of both the Bismarck and the British Battleship Hood. Captured in Europe at the end of WWII, the Eugen was brought to Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands, where she was part of the target fleet anchored in Bikini Lagoon during two atomic bomb tests in 1946. Brought to Kwajalein from Bikini after the tests, she developed a leak that ultimately sank her.

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This 42 minute video focuses on coral reef dwelling animals without backbones. The video contains 631 separate scenes and was filmed entirely at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, Micronesia. The tape is set entirely to music with no narration, although a booklet describing each scene is included.

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This 45 minute video contains more than 400 separate scenes of marine animals and was filmed entirely at Kwajalein, Marshall Islands, Micronesia. The tape is set entirely to music with no narration. A short booklet identifying the animals in each scene is included, but a more detailed write up that includes numerous captured frames is available for download in PDF format.

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During the months of July and August 2000, members of Oceanic Research Group along with history and dive specialists filmed the underwater sequences for their fifth full-feature documentary, The Silent Wrecks of Kwajalein Atoll. During the Second World War, Japanese and American forces fought for control of the Pacific. Kwajalein Atoll, part of the Marshall Islands, saw several battles during which many ships and planes came to rest on the floor of her lagoon. This film examines the battle for Kwajalein through the underwater wrecks of those battles. Because Kwajalein has remained a U. S. military base since the war, few filmmakers have been able to film these wrecks, but Oceanic Research Group was granted permission by the U. S. Army and the Republic of Marshall Islands to enter her waters. The silent wrecks may now tell their story.

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